Wednesday’s Wonders

Today is actually Toppers Tuesday which is where a group of local Hot Rodder’s gather and discuss various topics related to cars. I was still thinking about my starter button problem and that soon became the focus of the table. Soon after finishing our gourmet pizza, Bob-O (back from B’ville) and Dave offered to come over and look at the situation and see if they could assist. Networking and consensus management were my strong points while working and they still work today. I had plenty of advice and had ordered some new parts, but Dave didn’t think it was the starter button that was causing the problem. My starter button is hooked to a relay that distributes the juice to the neutral safety switch and starter. Upon a closer look, the wire from the starter button to the relay was very loose and the screw holding the wire was stripped which prevented it from staying tight. To test Dave’s theory, we hooked a jumper wire ( I had made one) to the back of the button and grounded it to the car. Presto, the engine fired immediately. Now we did not determine if the bottom was at fault by this test so we installed the button in the dash and again the engine fired right away. Smiles were on all three of our faces as the motor’s lumpy cam reminded us of our early days of hearing the motor we had built turn over and start. I would like to thank Bob-O and Dave for making my day.

While undergoing this ordeal it became necessary to jack up the car to inspect the NSW in case it was at fault. My car is so low you cannot place a floor jack under the front crossmember in order to lift the car. I was ready to spring for a Tri-C FlatJack ($200) when Walt said to look for a scissor jack from a late model car. I took his advice and found a perfect one in my new Denali. I was able to slide the jack under the front chin and raise the car about 10 inches off the ground. I don’t know how much the jack cost but I will stop by the dealer or junk yard and purchase one to carry in Pepe. Yesterday was a bad day and today was wonderful for solving plaguing problems. Now I can work on the front brakes to keep them from squealing. Keep moving forward and you will be O.K.

I didn’t make it to Monterey due to car trouble but I am sure to receive some photos.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

My help arrived in style (Toppers Tuesday Staff member, Dave). He just finished a complete rebuild of his long time 40 convert.

This looks like our high school days in Decatur, IL – save the Terrain. We still have the same sickness as we did in 1957.

Yes, this is the position required to work on the fuse and relay panel. I would have to call 911 if I could get in this position. The dashboard needs to fold down so you could sit in the seat and work on the components. The upholstered panel below the dash has got to go. That is a future project with the A/C vents hidden behind the ash trays.

The Lokar NSW is a simple switch but hard to reach when located under the car. They do go bad. A by-pass is required to start the car. The car will only start in neutral which is a good thing in my mind.

Cars in this driveway are always nice but expensive. This was a local car for years and the real deal. Easy access to all components and a classic early look make it worth the money.

John likes customs and this chopped 34 is a good example of some early work on 4 doors. John can locate the photos better than most.

Here is the Cadillac of FlatJacks. Pricey but a work of art for the deep pocket rodder’s. They run around $200 out the door. Santa are you listening to me?

Here is the budget flat jack from my new Denali. Height is 2 1/2″.

The scissor jack will extend to 17 ” which is more than enough to change the tire or slide the floor jack under the front end on my 40.

 Wednesday’s Deuces!

Long time friend, Phil has one of the best 3 windows in the country. Dave Lane built the car with great attention to detail and many unique features.

Roy built this one and almost captured the AMBR award a few years ago. Note the channeled body and lack of wheel wells on this very fine Deuce.

Photos are from the internet.

Comments 3

  1. Hello Lynn,

    I bought an aluminum screw-type Porsche jack (standard equipment for the last 20 years or so) from a salvage yard. Like the one you show, it too has a raised section to fit a specific lift point so I used a large drill to hollow out a section of a hockey puck to fit and therefore there is no metal to metal contact when raising the car. Hockey pucks are also great for a floor jack.

    Cheers,
    Jim

  2. hi lynn.. its been some time since we have talked, but read your blog regularly…
    i’m the guy from siu, carbondale… two points…
    nuthin is finer than have help show up driving their
    hot rod.. it’s soooooo bitch’n…
    as for too low for jack.. i have used the flat oem jacks
    forever, had to weld a tab on the jack biscuit so it would not slip off the axle.. until i figured out to make a couple mini wooden ramps.. 2x8x18.. they are perfect, just drive up on the boards.. then slide my floor jack under the axle..
    later, dude…

  3. I found that the aluminum motorcycle jack from northern tools costs $80.00 works great also
    Lifts high enough to slip floor jack in

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