Wednesday’s Modern Day Engines

As I mentioned in my previous post, some of my friends had a few problems with their hot rods while in Bakersfield. Specifically, a new LS3 engine water pump that started leaking. The engine has less than 3000 miles on the odometer and should not have had a premature failure. Problems like this do occur and they usually can be traced to a faulty installation or lack of knowledge about the requirements of aluminum block/head engines. GM has long recommended the use of DEXCOOL in the cooling system mixed in a 50/50 ratio to prevent corrosion in the cooling system. Pure water or low coolant will cause premature failure of radiators, water pumps and gaskets. The green antifreeze also provides protection but the Dexcool provides longer protection in both cast iron and aluminum engines. I found this explanation on the net and think it explains the situation perfectly.

“DexCool: pros and cons:

Because DexCool does not coat the metal, in cast iron engines when the coolant level gets low, the iron will start to rust, which mixes with the coolant and creates chunks of gel flowing through the engine. In aluminum engines, if the DexCool level gets low, the aluminum will corrode and weaken, leading to gasket failures or worse. If you properly maintain your car, you shouldn’t have low coolant levels, and thus shouldn’t have this problem. A lot of the horror stories we hear stem from improper maintenance (improperly mixing DexCool, letting it get low, etc..). DexCool does NOT eat gaskets, as the tale goes. Gasket failures are the result of poor maintenance, old age, or poor design.”

I have an aluminum head engine in my car and have noticed the fluid level and the orange color coolant when inspecting the level but I will now do a check to make sure the mixture is correct. I know many times all I have done is add water (not distilled) to the system without thought of gasket failures. Like the EFI systems of today, the modern day additives need to be understood and strict maintenance procedures established for parts longevity.

Learning is an everyday process that makes us wiser. As someone once said; ” A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.”

Stay Tooned and Cool!

Lynn

May is about Deuce Sedans

I have always liked the Deuce sedan hiboy. The chopped version is my favorite but they all look good. I saw this one at the Petersen a few years ago. Don Smith built it and has quite a collection of Deuces.

I also like them with fenders and American 5 spokes. This is a typical Ohio styled Deuce.

Four doors are now in demand and several have been built into stunning hiboys. You will probably see this one at the LARS.

I love this view showing the spaciousness of the interior. Plenty of room for your buddies and grandkids.

This photo, from the HAMB, shows the structure of the four door model sedan. Note the nice chop and proportions on this one.

You don’t need a fancy sedan as the photo shows. Bolt it together and have some fun on the road. You will get lots of thumbs up with this one.

A perfect example of a Deuce tudor done right. They don’t get much better than this one.

If you prefer a little more hot rod flavor then this one may be for you. Just a slight chop and well done.

The prom queen will ride home in style with this BRG stylish Deuce.

Here is another non-chopped tudor that is stunning in a deep maroon with lots of detailing.

May’s Top Dollar Deuce Sedan!

Henry had a vision and built his dream with no compromises. The profile is right on the money.

Currently on eBay with a $150,300 bid (reserve not met) this has to be the highest price I have ever seen for a Deuce tudor. Way to go Henry!

Comments 3

  1. I couldn’t agree with you more on this that “A little knowledge is a most dangerous thing”, It’s not applicable in cars but in every field. One should have clear idea what is going on, then they should give their opinion on anything.

  2. How could a $150,000 get an atta boy? They should be worth say : $750.00 tops,, and I’ll take 10 please..

  3. Hi Lynn, the 8th car in the line up of deuce sedans which you are saying is not chopped, I have to say i think it is. Not a lot . Maybe just the amount of a stock Vickie which is about 1.25 inches from the factory compared to a tudor from the factory. Roy and I did this observation when he was here with the 2 cars side by side. Both cars take the same windshield but just back of that the side windows shrink down. It was 1 inch to 1.25. Not a well known fact. Anyway #8 has a slightly lowered lid. Check it out.
    Best regards
    Gar

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