Patina Rods

We went through a period a few years ago when Patina Hot Rods were the rage. Some builders even made their new build look old by using rusty parts and distressed new paint/primer on their ride. I never cared for the look, but I was always drawn to a closer look when I ran across one at the shows. The LARS even had a place in their preferred parking area for these Patina Rods. The past 10 years have seen the Hot Rod building trend move back to very traditional Hot Rods copying some of the 1940’s looks in their builds. Since I am older I enjoyed the look except for the “Rat Rod” look which turns me off completely. I respect each builder and his choice of style in his build but draw the line on the skull and cross bones look I have seen at some events. That’s just my taste and is not meant to be disrespectful of the builder. I do believe that some of the movement is a direct slam at the high cost of paint and upholstery work today which prohibits many from pursing a shiny example of a Hot Rod and yet many examples exemplifies the High School look many of us older folks like. The fact that a person likes to build modified cars is a plus to me — no matter what the style. Finding a Barn with an old Hot Rod is my dream but it would have to be made safe and sound before driving.

The trend has diminished in our area except for a few that have lingered on from the early builds. I have some photos of ones that I like and will share them with you today

 

 

Stay Tooned!

Lynn



click on photo for a larger image



Finding one like this is what I’m talking about. An old Hot Rod with the natural Patina from years of outside storage.

Old school build the Hot Rod look and some Patina.

These Patina roadster attract a lot of attention.

A great shot of a Patina roadster.

Probably and old Hot Rod or one pieced together by the Kennedy Boys.

Here is a perfect example of an old Hot Rod on the Salt.

The chop on this one is perfect in my mind.

My friend just purchased a 40 rag and will make it look like this one.

Outside storage caused some rust issues but with some work would make a great Patina Tub.

Two local cars with natural Patina and built recently from Barn Finds.

A nice Patina sedan with a full flathead at Donuts is a desirable piece.

Years of outside storage give this coupe the Patina look.

Some natural chips a deteriorating paint and top make this 33 perfect as is.

Looks new/old but I like the look.

Cam’s 33 is right on the money for the Patina look and is the real deal.

Dave’s tub is the real deal with 200,000 miles of road warrior Patina. His truck is also as found.

 

Maybe just a coat of primer to freshen the old girl up would make it presentable.

The Pines Winter Front and plenty of Patina states a lot about this coupe.

Work in progress and a cool driver as found. These cars an inexpensive to purchase in this stage.

Found as an old surf wagon and updated with LS power makes this one a Patina driver.

Comments 1

  1. Patina finishes seems to bring out the best or worst in people, depending on their definition. I have come full circle with it because of a couple of my cars. The first was a 32 5-window I had, that was naturally Patined, and I didn’t think much about it, until one year at the LARS, someone asked me if I had done the Patina myself, and I didn’t even know what they ment, so I just laughed. Little did I know, in a few years, I would build a 53 F-100 and do a fake patina on it myself. It came out pretty cool and people seem to like it. However, I think it is a little over done now, so I am re-painting it, in a satin flat. I guess I am not ready for shiney, but don’t like rust either, so hopefully, it will hit a happy medium. With all the work I am doing ,I have been driving my 34 5-window allot, and I realized ,I last painted it in 1989, and it has gotten a little scuffie, in fact it is getting to the point, that I think ,I might just get asked, ” How I did the Patina?”

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