Monday’s Mood

Once in a while I grow tired of writing about the old Fords, but I always regain my composure and search through my vast library of photos for something from a few years back. I know looking ahead for trends and new cars is important for my viewers but looking at some past events and cars that caught my eye may spark some new ideas. I have talked about Jag rear ends and Mustang II front ends being the hot set up for many in the 70’s & 80’s. Adding all the late model amenities to your ride in the 90’s and then a sudden turn of events took place in the millennium — like dropped axles, Buick drums, Lincoln brakes and a host of other traditional items came back into style. Manufacturers and builders scrambled to offer traditional styled products to support the trend. This style seems to still be popular with today’s builds.

Look at this year’s AMBR winner and you can see the thinking of many enthusiasts today. I think even the younger generation really likes to emulate cars of the past. Some of these builds really are done quite well by individuals as well as shops like Brizio’s. Roy has some high end customers who really prefer the Hot Rods of the past over the hi-tech models. The late Boyd Coddington, who always was way ahead of the curve in building smooth cars and one-off creations, ventured into the retro look on some of his last builds. What the future holds for us who love these old cars is an unknown. The automotive artist can creative concepts that can become a reality for those who have the vision and the pocketbook to make it happen.

I continue to live in the past and plan to stay there, but watching this hobby and industry grow over the past 40 years has given me a good perspective of what I like and what I appreciate. I have always been a traditional style Hot Rod lover and I don’t think I will change anytime soon.

See you at Doheny Wood this Saturday in Dana Point.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

 

 

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Ruby is back on the market after being traded for another toy. Please see the For Sale section  for details. I was the caretaker of this car for a few months and it is a very well executed modified Woodie. A very dependable ride with lots of care over the years.

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Gary built a nice 37 Cabriolet that is not seen in the shows like they used to be when Gibbons started the popularity with their glass version. This one is steel.

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My friend, the late Joy Mayall, got me hooked on the 33 hiboy roadsters and I am still in love.

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Longtime car builder, Andy, likes 40 Fords and built a beautiful sedan with the stash box behind the grille.

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Seldom seen is the 39 Ford convertible sedan. This was at Andy’s Picnic a few years ago.

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Plenty of room for the grandkids or adult passengers in the back seat of these sedans.

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I do like the 46 Ford convertibles the best of the 46-48 models. The trim strips are beautiful.

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Orville can make the sedan model into a really great looking ride.

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I followed this nice ride into our hotel and talked to fellow and his wife for a long time about their nice 48 rag.

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Steve always has some neat projects on display in P-Town — like this track nose Deuce.

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Steve finished Dennis’s AMBR contender and it’s a first class ride.

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P-Town also provides a nice display for Woodies. The covered area keeps the sun off the precious wood.

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Take a 37 hump and make it Roadster.

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My old sedan was getting weighed for a new set of rear coil over shocks.

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I should really have these license plates on my car.

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Tom built a stunning 36 Phaeton for Bob and green was the theme.

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I am not sure what happened to the car but it was certainly a beautiful Phaeton.

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If I live long enough, I would like to build a nice shoebox convertible like this one.,

The “Past Look” in a new build.

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Henry can turn out some really wonderful Deuces at his Steadfast Shop.

The Future “Look ” by the Master in an old build.

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Boyd loved the 29 and aluminum. He built this one out of aluminum during his later years. I am not sure what he would be building today, if he were still with us, but I know it would soon be the latest trend in the Hot Rod World.

Comments 1

  1. Lynn, I’m with you on traditional. You cannot beat the look of the dropped axle, buggy springs and all things old. They are timeless. New trends come and go but that old time look lasts forever.

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