Monday’s Madness

I can’t watch any more basketball as I am burnt out. UCLA reaching the Sweet 16 is good enough for me and Kentucky kept me on edge the entire game — so I am done till the final four. I can at least work in the garage while watching basketball and that is what I did all weekend. Jane helped me fit the rails into the jig for the first time. The back frame horn brackets needed to be repositioned and that took a while, cutting them off, grinding some here and there — then re-welding. Now everything is bolted into the jig hangers and the frame is accurate in all directions. I usually chase these dimensions over a 1/16″ but I like them to be square as they do move after all the welding. This is the first jig I have ever owned so I will be anxiously waiting to take the frame out of the jig and see if the measurements all hold.

When building a chassis you have lots of choices on ways to box the frame, mount the X-members and position all the brackets required to make everything work as they should. I normally tack everything in place and never final weld until the entire chassis is completed. More often than you would think, I end up moving something due to something else taking precedence. After 50 years, you would think I would know where everything is supposed to go but I still make mistakes which are easily fixed if you just tack the part. This is also the first set of ASC rails I have used and I must agree fresh metal is very nice to work with and not having to repair rust areas and fill pits is the way to go. I know the nuance of having to register a new chassis but I think the drill is worth it. Now for some 34 license plates.

Have a good week in the garage and accomplish your goals.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

 

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The stock 40 convertible has a top that needs lowered in the center bow area as shown above. The lowering of the bow makes the lines flow so much smoother on a non-chopped 40. This is a high end build and looks very nice but is also priced in the 6 figures. Stance is a must to add to the lowered top but not too much drop in the front or rear. I like this profile.

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Here is another Davison exquisite photo of a beautiful 40 convert with the top down. The stance is perfect on this one for my taste as is the color.

Ardens 34

I love to see the hot rods doing what we used to built them for — racing! There is a flat motor under the hood….16.60.

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The Speed 33 is catching on and I know of several being built in our area. You can make them very traditional or an hi-tech looking depending on your taste. I prefer the dropped axle front ends on these cars and would add hinges.

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This completed 33 was at the LARS and I fell in love all over again with this style of Speed 33.

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I believe this is the first sun visor I have seen on a 40 delivery. Would that be a Fulton?

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Tom captured a beautiful photo of this Sid’s perfect 5 window coupe. Black on Back has always been a favorite of mine.

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Built by the late Don Thelan and now owned by the Goodguy himself, this beautiful chopped Mercury has quite a history.

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The proportions are perfect as is the woodwork and paint on this high end woody. Lots of work to chop one of these and make it look factory.

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The roadster boys will be heading out for some cursing up the coast in the near future. Phil has the best top on a roadster as well as a mighty fine ride to join in the festivities.

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I see a lot of Lyle’s photos on Facebook but this Deuce sedan is one of my favorites. You can just see the IFS under the front fenders but I am sure it rides like a dream.

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Sometimes an engineer builds a flathead to outdo himself like this one above. Note the individual coil packs mounted on the firewall.

Monday’s Project

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The rails are attached to the jig for a trial fit. I now need to make the side braces to pull the rails into shape.

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I had to remake the rear brackets to fit the new rails which are 34 not 32. The jig can do both frames by flipping them over. Side braces will be added next.

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The ASC rails fit in the jig with a little persuasion as did the X-member. The X-member is for a 32 and is being used as a guide for a new one from scratch. I am thinking the rear end needs to be replaced with a QC from Winters…but that will have to wait.

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The X-member is for a 32 but I will use it as a guide for making my own to fit the 34 rails. Mike Martens use to make these for me in the 70’s but I have a shop that will make them in the Valley.

Comments 2

  1. Ah, yes, the brown (maroon?) speed ’33 with cream wheels that lit our fire at LARS.
    We continue to collect parts, scored a nice ’40 steering column asy and took delivery of a Halibrand 301 roadster QC. Out of a drag car with full floaters etc which I have no use for. Upon inspection I noted a NOS end plate, 8/33 ring and pinion which is Winters, that the ends of the lower shaft and pinion were “buggered”, and loose pinion. The tang on the lock plate was sheared, which is no big deal, but the question is why? Some work with a stone and emery cured the bumps so that the end plate would go on, but not all the way, about 1/64″ short. More work with a die grinder and cut off wheel , I cut the splines back so that end plate would seat. So far so good. Now to find the right Detroit Trutrack for a Winters R&P in the Halibrand. Any suggestions? Next step it to the machine shop to true the EF flanges and cut off the end bearing stubs. Cost wise I’m doing OK and love the adventure.

    I am dying to use a Watts linkage. The best one that I have seen was at Lawsons where they used a caged Torrington around the seal plate. (not impossible) Knowing that the arms have to be the same length, how about offsetting the mounting points in the chassis. Left or right side or would it matter? Can the pivot arm be “L” shaped to place the ends in the center of the pinion? Or some of both?

    About two weeks ago you showed a nice triangulated four bar set up which looks identical to
    the set up under my roadster. After the GG Indy tour of ’04 (5,700 miles, 17 days) I discovered that the urethane bushings were wasted. Apparently these bushings do not like to be twisted. I replaced the forward ends with Heims with grease seals. 20K miles later there is no wear. I would advise this setup for drivers.

    You just showed your frame with a “X” member which is what I used on my roadster. This setup ate up a lot of room underneath. For my sedan I cut off the rear legs and used them to form a very large “K” member, with a 1X2 tube on the top to form the “X”, incorporated a Chris Alston oval drive shaft loop and then formed a long 4 bar with the forward ends anchored at the “K”, and then used a “track” bar .

    An amateur builder to say the least, I have learned some lessons.

    Keep up the good work.

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