Friday’s Fords

Bob-O and I worked all afternoon installing the Vintique running board covers on his new 40 sedan. I have not done this procedure for several years but I did recall how much work it was to do it right. The covers are very nice and fit the boards perfectly except the front fender edge which is a little too long. We followed the explicit instructions and were happy with the result. Tomorrow we will do the other side. The secret is to have lots of clamps to hold the covers in place during the procedure and during the time the glue sets up. I know you can buy new Bob Drake units that are super nice but then that wouldn’t be the way two old hot rodders would have done it.

Update on my 40 woody dream. How about a stocker stored since 1957 with 6200 miles? I may need a loan.

I will keep the rhetoric short tonight as we all listened to too much talk last night. All I pray for is a reduced deficit and a much stronger economy with less government intervention in our freedom. I hear Romney is a car guy.

See you at the Throttlers Picnic on Sunday. I will be first in line for the pancake breakfast and tri-tip lunch.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

Bob-O had worked a couple of days getting the boards ready for the new covers. The boards are in mint condition which made it easy to recover them.

If you want a quality job you will need to fill the spot welded grooves. Bob used metal to metal and sanded it smooth.

Per the instructions, we installed the cover, clamped the lip edge and started brushing on the glue. It is critical that the cover be installed centered on the board or you will have a problem at the fender edges. Note how straight the edge of the boards are. I wish mine were this nice.

Bob-O works very neatly and applied the glue per the instructions. The glue sets up quickly so you can’t make any mistakes. Note the clamps.

It is now 4:00 pm and we are finished with one side. Does this look like your driveway on the weekends? Wait until you retire, and you can do this everyday. The flame continues to burn in Simi Valley, CA.

Ohio Cars, Bob Oney, has a nice 40 woody wagon going together in his shop. Mike Nickels did the wood and Bob did the rest. A Heidts front end, TCI parallel leaf rear, 350/350 make up the remaining dependable driving chassis. He loves black with the light Maple wood. He should be done by next the Wavecrest. I hope to see him on the West coast again.

The interior of the 40 woody wagon is very simple. Note he has used fixed glass in the doors and rear windows which normally slide horizontally to open. He has also made wood moldings rather than the hard to locate stock steel ones. The door latches are gold plated and are now being reproduced in the LA area. The wheel wells are the key to installing the wood for the doors and quarters.

The rear fenders are also hard to locate and will cost you more than you want to pay. Bob added a 3rd brake light and a single rear widow in the tailgate. He told me he has a set of Wise guy seats to install to make this a very nice and comfortable riding wagon. A complete new woody body like this runs from $30 -40K depending on where you have it done. I would estimate it would also take a couple of years to get yours completed. I am looking for used wood with patina but I love this look and so does Jane. Nice job Bob.

Here is what Bill started with in his 40 woody wagon. Note how solid this rear floor is. This was a one owner woody and is now being restored by someone who cares about the history of these old wagons. I am hooked on woody wagons.

Today’s Sedan Delivery!

I have known about this delivery for many years. The car is a rust free original and has been done for a long time. Currently on eBay by a dealer in VA.

I love this view with the stock dual tail lights and correct rear bumper. They look good in maroon. (78 Ford truck, medium Cabernet Red)

 

Comments 1

  1. A 40 wagon with 6200 miles OMG!! What a prize. Without revealing the location I would love to see a
    few pics and some history. Personally I like contrasting panels on 39/48 wagons. JMPO. Bill

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.