Friday’s Fords

The wife is busy organizing her many photos into something we can scan and file away for our children and grandkids. I think it is important to take a look at the past once in a while. I know I still have fond memories of my early days in high school and college and the wife found some photos of me my father kept for over 70 years. The camera has long been the best source for recording the past. I can recall spending a lot of money having the 24 and 36 rolls of Kodak developed after car shows or family events. I am sure most of you have shoeboxes full of photos of your past. The digital age made it much easier to take lots of photos inexpensively and organize them on your computer, phone or iPad.

I no longer look at the paper photos very often but when I do, I recall some fabulous times and wonderful cars of the past. My father had saved a photo of me when I was about 3 or 4 years old riding in my pedal car with a girl. I haven’t changed much in 70 years as that is still my favorite pastime. A photo of a young man in his car is about as good as it gets in my book and the first girlfriend who got to ride in your Hot Rod was really worth remembering. I suspect many of you can recall that time of your life. Somehow the memory of a cool car and your sweetheart puts a smile on your face that last forever. I wonder who Sherry was in 1944?

I have redone the valve covers and they came out really nice and took some photos for you. The paint quality of a rattle can can’t compare to the spray gun but it will have to do until the price of paint comes down. I will admit that they have improved the spray can nozzles so you can adjust the spray pattern when required. VHT is about $8.00 a can around here and two cans will do an engine. That beats the $140 cost of material at the paint store. If I could find the formula for the Chevrolet Orange or something close I would step up for the good stuff if I ever end up using this engine. I like shiny.

The weekend brings a Hot Air Ballon show and car exhibit in Santa Paula which sounds interesting. Jane and I may head out there to see the daredevils do their thing. Have a great weekend and take some photos around the house and send them to me.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

Thanks to all of you who sent me the photos of Deuce Days in Victoria. I felt I was almost there.

Scott had his fresh Brizio Deuce in Victoria. Perfect stance on this mor-door makes it a standout.

The Winter Front and Vanilla Shake firewall really add to the class of this sedan.

Black on Black 5 – window was looking good sitting by the water’s edge. Is that a QC peeking out from under the rear pan?

I use to see this car in Danville at Max’s Diner on Saturday mornings. The new owner keeps it immaculate and the old owner had Roy build him a clone in steel. Nice top on the Duvall windshield.

Another Black on Black beauty in Victoria was attracting a crowd. A photo can tell it all without any words. The love affair continues.

A 36 roadster doesn’t have to park outside of town as they are a real beauty also.

Long a favorite of mine is this old Rodger Bell phaeton that still looks good after all these years. Rodger only knows 99L for paint.

Tom, who has a garage full of Deuces, decided to drive his woody for the comfort and luggage space when you take your wife along. Victoria,BC loves woodies.

I found this beauty on the HAMB and fell in love with the model 40 again. No small feat to build a car like this in Europe. Parts are hard to come by.

The rear looks perfect with the Deuce lights and stock gas tank.

Friday’s Sedan Delivery!

I first met Chick Brignolo in 1979 while working in Boston. He builds outstanding chassis and has a nice collection of cars. He loves sedan deliveries and purchased Chuck Lombardo’s 32 in the 80’s. Lots of fire coming out of this engine compartment. I need to have my bumper installed.

If it weren’t for old photos how would we remember these wonderful days? Walt and his Dad’s 41 sedan delivery somewhere it LA in the 50’s.

Comments 1

  1. Hi Lynn: Great picture of your friend Walt and the 1941 Sedan Delivery. It appears not to have a solid roof. Was that common for the sedan deliveries of that vintage? Thanks.

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