Filling in the Gap and Tops

We were talking at lunch today about the Deuce’s being built today seem to have a large gap between the body and gas tank on roadsters. I have built many and never had that problem so it must be the body or the frame is not quite right. I have seem them the correct way and with panels added between the body and gas tank. I don’t think this looks good and should be corrected during the build. I have been told that most builders correct this gap by pie cutting the rails to bring them up to make a nice small gap. It may just be me but I like the easy correction to gain the appearance I like on a hiboy coupe, roadster or sedan.

Eliminating the gas tank and adding a rolled pan or steel round tube is also popular but really robs the trunk space in the already compact area. I am currently working with a stock chassis and a Brookville body so I will keep you updated on how the apparent problem is addressed. Model 40’s don’t have this problem as the lip on the panel below the trunk has a lip that extends over the tank. Building a Hot Rod requires some work to improve the parts you have selected but the little extra effort will pay off when you stand back and take a look.

I added some top photos as many of you asked about the stock irons and bows we use in our little group.

Stay Tooned!

Lynn

 



click on photo for a larger image



This beautiful roadster has the side covers which I like and the gap panel installed. Looks great but shouldn’t be there for my taste.

I know that this is a SO-CAL chassis and Brookville body that Cory made the gap perfect. I am thinking they moved the rails up to make it like this.

 

Looking at the gap from this angle you can see the rails appear to have been pie cut.

Hard to tell from this photo but the above photo shows how I like’m  to look. No big gap!

Here is another roadster with the large gap.

Walt’s stock body and chassis has a very small gap.

Joe’s roadster appears to have a very small gap between the body and tank.

The extended quarter panels fill the gap on the sides.

Derek’s Wescott body seems to fit perfect on the new rails but may be pie cut.

Brookville body on a stock chassis with correct gap in my mind.

Of course, if you eliminate the gas tank you can add a rolled pan to take up the space.

Here is another approach to filling the gap.

When you add fenders the gas tank apron helps fill up the gap.

Here is an original with a rusted out lower reveal but still shows the minimal gap.

Gates custom makes his irons for your particular car. These were for a 3″ chop.

Once finished and polished they are installed and ready for the top material to be added.

Neil polished the stainless and uses rivets just like the originals.

Bob O makes sure he fits under the bows. Perfect fit!

The finished roadster looks good with the top.

All loaded up and heading for Pomona.

Comments 3

  1. I have a 32 five window coupe that is a 50’s unrestored hot rod .When I open the trunk there is no mat in place just bare painted metal were these cars originally equipped with some sort or rubber trunk mat or shipped with a bare metal trunk.If there was a mat where can I get a correct one ?

  2. pew is the guy shotgun side of joes roadster a guy named paul gellette looks like him sure would like to get ahold of him if anyone knows

  3. Lynn,
    I agree with your observation on the gap above the fuel tank. The only thing worse than an unsightly gap is the “loaded diaper” look of a large capacity fuel tank on a deuce. A stock tank is very stylish, why would anyone fool with perfection?
    Keep up the great postings!

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